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Galcon Fusion for Mac Review

Developer: Galcon.com

Price: $1.99 (£1.19) – on sale

Description: A Simple Galactic Arcade-Strategy Game

App Store Link

Rating

Pros: A simple concept but milti-faceted execution and extraordinary strategical depth.

Cons: Annoying bubble wrap sound effects, unforgiving online combat.

Advised Control Method: Mouse (trackpad unusable)

Review

Galcon Fusion is one of those games where you think you have mastered the gameplay after just a few goes at single player, and step boldly into the multiplayer realm, only to get walloped. On the outside, Galcon Fusion may seem like a simple galactic arcade-strategy game, but it requires some complex strategic thinking and good reaction times that only hard graft and commitment will give you. And this is what makes it an excellent strategy game, one not to look over.

In Galcon Fusion, you are placed in a space-arena dominated by planets of varying size. Your goal is to conquer these planets, expand in size and continue conquering. And to do that, you have your trusty coloured arrows which capture objectives. But the enemy will be trying to do the same thing, so you need to make note, and even attack the enemy to hinder their own development. The developers have really nailed a concept that is incredibly easy to get the hang of, but contains a high level of challenge and diversity for the more experienced players.

But Galcon Fusion doesn’t give you one mode to play over and over again. Oh no. There are many modes that focus on specific gameplay elements which help improve your skills on the battlefield. To name a few, Billiards – the planets are constantly moving which makes planet capture all the more important, Stealth – where all enemy ship are invisible – and Assassin – both players are aiming to take certain planetary targets. The 10 different difficulty levels help you accustom the opponent to your preference as well.

However, the single player in Galcon Fusion only serves as practice for the multiplayer, where you get the opportunity to play against other Galcon players online. Safe to say, the first time I tried multiplayer, I ended up losing, and then complained at by my fellow comrades. Nice going, I know. But these experiences only motivate you to become better and more adept in the ways of Galcon Fusion.

The game’s presentation is minimalistic, and it pays off. I’m not so much of a fan of the sound made when attacking enemy planets. It’s the sound you’d get if you threw a load of energetic 5-year-olds into a room covered in bubble wrap. However the graphics are good, and work well when there is a huge wave of coloured arrows on the screen.

The phrase, easy to play, hard to master doesn’t fit better than in Galcon Fusion and if you are looking for a simple, yet deep, strategical experience then it doesn’t get better than this. As for me, I still have a lot to learn.

Gameplay Video